(770) 534-1080 Home|Partners
Facebook Twitter

Student FAQ

  1. When is a teenager considered an adult?
  2. Will a minor convicted of pushing drugsget off easily because he is not an adult?
  3. Is it possible for a person under 18 to go to prison for injuring someone else while driving under the influence of alcohol?
  4. Is drinking alcohol in a public place, regardless of who purchased it, against the law?
  5. Is it legal for a minor to buy alcohol, with parental permission?
  6. What is the legal penalty for possessing marijuana?
  7. Is it legal to purchase or possess drug paraphernalia?
  8. If a person is stopped for a traffic violation, can the car and its occupants be searched? Will the driver be responsible if someone in his or her car possesses marijuana?
  9. If there were traces of marijuana found in one's possession, could such a person be convicted of possession of a controlled substance?



  1. When is a teenager considered an adult?

    In the state of Georgia, a teenager will be charged as an adult the day he/she turns 17-years-old.

     
  2. Will a minor convicted of pushing drugsget off easily because he is not an adult?

    No. A minor can be sentenced to serve time in a juvenile detention center. A minor could also be sent to live at a facility away from his/her home for up to two years.

     
  3. Is it possible for a person under 18 to go to prison for injuring someone else while driving under the influence of alcohol?

    Yes, it is possible for a person under 18 to go to prison for injuring someone else while driving under the influence of alcohol, if said person is 17-years-old and, by driving under the influence, causes serious bodily harm to another individual; the punishment is up to 15 years in prison. If the offending person is 16-years-old or younger, he/she might have to serve time in detention or be sent to live in a place away from home for up to two years.

     
  4. Is drinking alcohol in a public place, regardless of who purchased it, against the law?

    Yes, drinking alcohol in a public place, regardless of who purchased it, is against the law. Consumption and/or possession is the offense, not how possession was obtained or the manner in which it was acquired. It does not matter how much alcohol one has in his/her possession.

     
  5. Is it legal for a minor to buy alcohol, with parental permission?

    No, it is illegal for a minor to buy alcohol, or to attempt to purchase alcohol, even with parental permission.

     
  6. What is the legal penalty for possessing marijuana?

    If a person is 17 years of age or older, possessing even less than an ounce of marijuana could cost him or her a fine of up to $1000 and/or up to 12 months in jail. Upon the second offense, one's fine will likely increase, along with the likelihood of jail time. One could also be placed on probation (with many restrictions and additional fees). If a person is convicted of possession of marijuana, his or her driver’s license will be suspended for 6 months, even if such a person was not driving when arrested. If a person is under the age of 16, his or her ability to get a driver's license will be delayed.

    Possession of more than one ounce of marijuana is a felony, punishable up to 10 years in prison.

     
  7. Is it legal to purchase or possess drug paraphernalia?

    No, it is not legal to purchase or possess drug paraphernalia. A third conviction for possession of drug related object is a felony and is punishable with up to 5 years in prison.

     
  8. If a person is stopped for a traffic violation, can the car and its occupants be searched? Will the driver be responsible if someone in his or her car possesses marijuana?

    If a person is stopped for a traffic violation, the car and its occupants can be searched if the police officer has reasonable grounds to search the car, including the trunk. Even an otherwise "innocent" person may be responsible if someone in the car has illegal drugs or alcohol and he or she knows about it.

     
  9. If there were traces of marijuana found in one's possession, could such a person be convicted of possession of a controlled substance?

    If there is enough substance to test and identify, there is enough to convict a person.

     
 
Do you have a question that you would like answered and posted on this page? If so, please click here to submit it.
Copyright © 2012 Drug Free Coalition | Internet Marketing Company: Full Media